Anti-extradition protesters say they are not worried about the prospect a split in their ranks over the airport attacks on Tuesday, but said they would reflect on their actions and look at ways to improve.

There’s been heavy criticism over the violent manhandling of two people from the mainland, as well as disruption to passengers after a large numbers stormed the check-in area of the airport. This came after mass sit-in from Friday which was largely peaceful.

Speaking at the latest “Citizens’ Press Conference”, activists said they would ways to improve their methods.

“Any violence or any injuries towards anybody is not the original intent of any of the protesters,” said one speaker who gave her name as Sophia Suen. “We’re not really sure whether those people who’ve committed those acts were in fact infiltrators or not.”

Suen said such incidents would’ve been avoided, if the government listened to their voices.

“We would invite the government to tell us any means by which we [can] adequately express our voices where they would actually hear us,” she said.

Suen also said they are disappointed to see the Airport Authority obtain an injunction order to ban protests there. But she said people in Hong Kong will find other ways to express their views.

The protesters also sought to reject the government’s claims that the protests, which is in its third month now, are to blame for a slowdown of the economy.

The protesters again called on the government to respond to their five demands in order to end the unrest, including withdrawing the now-suspended extradition bill and setting up an independent inquiry to look into alleged police brutality.